Practical Preparation

IMG_0599-scaled-e1628958693834-300x225.jpegIt was quite the lively time – six grandchildren, nine down to two, and four adults all together in one three-bedroom home; cousins that don’t get to see each other very often. Bed space was at a premium, and so the girls all slept in one room, most on quilts and blankets on the floor. Abby, being just under three-years-old, to make sure she didn’t wander around the house or turn bedtime into a perpetual party, spent her nights and her naps in a port-a-crib, albeit in that same room. Abby is of average height, and the space for her in this cozy little bed is adequate, but snug. Though the girls had somewhat of a hard time settling down at night, eventually everyone got to sleep (except for poor Mama who occupied the couch in there), and all was well.
One afternoon I went into the room to pick-up after naptime, and I literally laughed out loud. I’m not sure how Abby squeezed in amongst the items she had brought into her little nest, but it had to be a challenge. Abby had amassed quite the collection of varied toys. Along with her prized baby doll, Abby had napped in that compromised space with a pillow, at least three blankets and a sheet, a cash register complete with a phone and a microphone, plastic pieces of cake, a toy knife, a cake plate, a stuffed educational dog, and a book. She must have cleaned out a bit because there were three books next to the crib on the floor. I immediately thought to myself, “Wow, Abby was prepared!” I’m not exactly sure for what, but there was no chance that should sleep escape her, she would be bored because she’d have plenty of activities from which to choose.
This is actually a very good life lesson both for practical, every-day living and in our walk with the Lord. The Bible definitely addresses both. Of course, there is the proverbial passage about the ant: “Go to the ant, O sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise. Without having any chief, officer, or ruler, she prepares her bread in summer and gathers her food in harvest” (Proverbs 6:6-8, ESV). Further on in the book of Proverbs, we find the excellent wife who is also ready ahead of time for the needs of her family. “She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands. She is like the ships of the merchant; she brings her food from afar. She rises while it is yet night and provides food for her household and portions for her maidens. She considers a field and buys it; with the fruit of her hands she plants a vineyard… She puts her hands to the distaff, and her hands hold the spindle… She is not afraid of snow for her household, for all her household are clothed in scarlet*” (Proverbs 31:13-16, 19, 21, ESV). Clearly, there is much thought and planning that goes into a household that is run so efficiently. It is not always easy to be so organized, but it is something to which we can aspire.
It is even more important to be prepared each day for the tasks and encounters to which the Lord may call us. Second Timothy chapter four begins with these words, “I charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by his appearing and his kingdom: preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching” (2 Timothy 4:1-2, ESV). A key passage that reminds us to always be ready for the Lord’s plans is found in a parable that Jesus shared with his disciples. In Matthew chapter twenty-five is located “The Parable of the Ten Virgins,” which is a story meant to help us understand the kingdom of heaven. Ten young ladies were awaiting the coming of the bridegroom for the wedding feast. Five had readied themselves by bringing oil for their lamps, and they are called wise. The other five were unprepared for the bridegroom’s arrival, and they are labeled foolish. As the bridegroom approached, the foolish virgins tried to buy oil from the wise, but there wasn’t enough for all. When the foolish left to purchase some for themselves, the bridegroom came, the wise maidens took part in the feast, and the foolish virgins were shut out of the party. When they returned begging for entrance, the bridegroom answered, “Truly, I say to you, I do not know you. Watch therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour” (Matthew 25:12b-13, ESV).
Certainly, we should always be ready for the Lord’s return. But, by virtue of our time in the Bible and in prayer we should also be ready for the opportunity to encourage believers in the faith and to encourage non-believers to seek a life-giving relationship with Jesus. Like Abby we can be prepared; unlike Abby, our aim is not just to fill up our time with frivolous things to prevent boredom just in case we cannot sleep, but to make an impact that will last throughout eternity.
*(can mean double thickness) Footnote on Proverbs 31:21, Page 844, ESV Student Study Bible, Copyright 2011, Crossway, Wheaton, Illinois USA. All rights reserved.
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Perception

IMG_8133-300x215.jpgDespite my reluctance, I have had to step into the world of prescription glasses. Actually, it is no surprise as the last time I had to renew my driver’s license I had to squint so hard when looking into their vision testing machine, my eyeballs almost popped out of my head. Though I took more than one try to get it right, the compassionate DMV associate gave me a green light. However, I knew then that the next time I would be up for a license renewal, I would likely not fare so well. Even though I still have a couple years until that time, my husband continued to remind me that it would be in my best interest to get an eye appointment for an evaluation. I have neglected to mention that I also have used over-the-counter readers at ever-increasing strength for quite a few years. So I made and kept the aforementioned appointment. The combination of near and farsighted irregularities, along with astigmatism in the right eye, led to the following choices: (1) separate eyeglasses for near and farsighted use, (2) trifocals, (3) progressive lenses, or (4) giving up my driver’s license and preparing myself for auditory books for the rest of my life. Since I’m not ready for choice number 4 at this time, I decided to try the progressive lenses. I was measured, and all the info went to the lab.
The glasses were supposed to be available in two weeks – they took four; it should have been a hint. I finally picked them up along with wearing advice and instructions. I had heard this already, but I was told it is common to give one’s eyes (mind, body, soul, and spirit) two weeks to adjust to what is now to be a permanent fixture atop one’s nose. So, I wore them continually, except for showering and sleeping, of course. Because I opted for transition lenses, they tint when in the sun – pretty cool! I was not having too much trouble negotiating stair steps or the divots in our road when on prayer walks – awesome. Though the television screen seemed magnified by a thousand, I was seeing that clearly enough – bonus. There was one problem though, a big one. When I would try to read, I had to tip my head back into a very awkward position or I had to push the frames up into my forehead to see the print clearly. At first I thought I just needed to be a good sport and finish out my two-week trial period, but when I shared my experience with my husband, he called the office and got me a new appointment. It turned out that the correction for reading was way too narrow and far down in the lenses to allow for optimal sight. A measurement error of just a few millimeters when creating the lenses caused my perception to be way off. What was meant to be a fix for my inadequate eyesight was in fact a fail on the part of the lens manufacturer. They went back to the drawing board, and I went back to my readers (for now).
We can have a similar experience regarding the world and what is going on around us. Our vision is blurred by a point-of-view that has been shaped by our environment in the past and the circumstances and information by which we are surrounded in the present. It causes our perception to be way off, even if the viewpoint we’re looking through is just slightly skewed. We might try to bring things into focus by using what is touted as the best and latest fix for our attitude or behavior, even advocated in Christian circles. But, we still are not seeing clearly. Frankly, we have to go back to the lens. The only appropriate glass for our clear and cognizant view of the world is to look through the lens of the Bible. It is solely as we perceive what is around us by shining the light of God’s Word on it that we can really see the truth about the world and about ourselves.
Psalm 119 is especially authoritative on the use of God’s Word to shape our view. Here are just a few examples of the wisdom it contains about the Word: “Open my eyes, that I may behold wondrous things out of your law” (vs. 18). “Your testimonies are my delight; they are my counselors” (vs. 24). “Teach me good judgment and knowledge, for I believe in your commandments” (vs. 66). “I have more understanding than all my teachers, for your testimonies are my meditation” (vs. 99). “Through your precepts I get understanding; therefore I hate every false way” (vs. 104). “Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (vs. 105). “The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple” (vs. 130) (all verses ESV). By looking through the lens of God’s Word we can be sure that we are seeing things with godly perception, and we will be more prone to live our lives with the right perspective.
I’m thankful that there are such things as corrective lenses so that I can continue to read, drive, enjoy God’s wonderful creation, and see those that I love dearly. Even more, I am grateful to God that he has given his Word through which we can perceive the world. May he always lead me to see as he sees so I can respond like him.
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