Close at Hand

IMG_E0987-182x300.jpgI have once again been blessed to have spent time with my daughter and her family in Texas to welcome our newest little grandson, Easton Levi, into the world. I helped with the care of all three little ones, and while it was a very special time, it was also often hectic. I tried to be diligent to keep up with the household chores such as the never-ending laundry and the dirty dishes that made their way to the sink (or not) throughout the day. But I also am keenly aware of how important it is to continue to care for myself so I remain healthy and strong in mind, body, and spirit. I often read my Bible and took a shower or bath at night to make sure to get those necessities in. And there is one thing I did in the mornings every day as per usual to keep my back from giving me trouble – a thirty-minute exercise routine that includes stretches, push-ups, sit-ups, and scrunchies, my four-year-old granddaughter’s term for crunches.

No matter where I visit, all my younger grandchildren are interested in my daily ritual, and I often have company participating in close proximity. On one of the first few days of this stay, my terrific two-year-old grandson, Caden, took it to the next level. He decided not only to join in, he was on the bottom part of my legs with his chubby little hands grasping above my knees as I did those aforementioned “scrunchies.” It made for quite an interesting, humorous, and very cozy process. This was not unlike the camaraderie I experienced from a dog we had a few years back who also held to the philosophy that he had to continually occupy the same square foot of space as I did, despite the large size of our home. Both Caden and our beloved furry friend provided a tangible illustration of the word “near.” So congenial of them both!
A few days after this incident, I was reading about Saul, the first king of Israel, in the Book of 1 Samuel Chapter 10. This chapter relays the anointing of Saul and his humble beginnings as king and even his hesitancy to sit on the throne. That would not remain true, but at this juncture, Saul was all about following and honoring God. As told in the prophecy of Samuel the Seer (what prophets were called in those days), Saul was to see three signs confirming his kingship. The culmination of these signs was Saul joining a group of prophets. “Then the Spirit of the LORD will rush upon you, and you will prophesy with them and be turned into another man” (1 Samuel 10:6, ESV). The following text really caught my attention: “Now when these signs meet you, do what your hand finds to do, for God is with you” (1 Samuel 10:7, ESV). This may have been just a little bit heady for Saul as he quickly turned from humility to self-sufficiency, making decisions without God’s input and performing sacrifices, which he was not authorized to do. Samuel’s advice from God, however, was sound. When one finds himself connected to God, listening to him in prayer, following his Word, and observing how God is moving around him, doing what the heart is urging is natural and very appropriate. But it takes that nearness to God to be able to confidently step out in faith and accomplish much in his Name. His closeness is welcome and more than congenial – it is a necessity to our growth and victory as believers.
My time with the family in Texas has come to an end. It was hard to leave behind those chubby little hands, the impish grins, the chaos, and the crazy. But I know that each time I do my exercise routine, I will cherish the memory of the nearness of one little boy that September morning. And, I am moving forward with the hope that I will inch ever closer to my Savior so that my hand can do what it finds to do for his glory.
“Nevertheless, I am continually with you; you hold my right hand. You guide me with your counsel, and afterward you will receive me to glory… For behold, those who are far from you shall perish; you put an end to everyone who is unfaithful to you. But for me it is good to be near God; I have made the Lord God my refuge, that I may tell of all your works” (Psalm 73:23-24, 27-28, ESV).
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The Nitty Gritty of Godly Relationships

IMG_8226-300x215.jpgIt was super sweet. My eight-year-old granddaughter, Libby, is becoming quite handy in the kitchen. In that particular way she takes after this Nonnie, and following in my footsteps, a lovingly made edible is a gift from the heart. Thus, for Mother’s Day, Libby decided to make her mother breakfast in bed. It was simple enough – a piece of toast, eggs, fruit, and some tea, but it was very appreciated by her Mama who was grateful for the wonderful gesture that allowed her to linger in bed a little bit longer on this celebrated day.
It was her younger sister, Bekah, who told me about Libby’s gracious gift to their mom. She was also quick to inform me about a time when Libby treated her to breakfast in bed. I’m not sure if it was just for the ease of preparation or if it happens to be a favorite, but Bekah’s breakfast special was cereal. Keep in mind that Bekah sleeps above her sister in a top bunk. I still laugh when I think back to how Bekah told me about Libby’s surprise. “Yeah, Libby made Mommy breakfast in bed for Mother’s Day, but she did for me one time too. Mine was cereal, but when she gave it to me, she got cereal sand all over my sheets!” First of all, I’ve never quite heard the crumbly remains of cereal referred to in that way before. But I noted that Bekah was telling me this in a very jovial manner, and I interpreted that as her delight and thankfulness for her sister’s kind act, gritty sheets and all.
The reason I love this story so much is because I am familiar enough with my granddaughters to know that there are times Libby and Bekah are not showing much love and appreciation for one another. Anyone who has seen two children in the same room for more than a passing moment would be able to concur that disagreements, arguing, and sometimes outright fighting come with close proximity. But Libby’s overture toward her sister and Bekah’s receptive response show how they can often pull together and support each other, demonstrating kindness, gentleness, and love that is heartwarming and genuinely considerate.
Unfortunately, people in general can treat each other with disrespect and even hostility, stories about which seem to cram news feeds these days. It is so sad! The saddest thing of all, though, is when it happens amongst those in the Body of Christ. In the book of Galatians, Paul makes reference to those who “bite and devour one another,” and tells them to “watch out that you are not consumed by one another” (Galatians 5:15, ESV). This was written to people in the church, and it shows that the problem has been around since the church’s inception, and it is ongoing.
Before Paul warned people about the hardship of tearing each other apart, he gave the positive side of the equation by reminding them to “serve one another. For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’” (Galatians 5:13d-14, ESV). He also wrote these words in the end of second Corinthians: “Finally, brothers, rejoice. Aim for restoration, comfort one another, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss,” (2 Corinthians 13:11-12, ESV). The words speak loudly to us today. While those in the church may disagree and argue from time to time, the bottom line is that we need to love and support each other, asking for forgiveness when necessary and remembering our common ground that gives us true peace, our relationship with God the Father through his Son, Jesus. While Libby and Bekah have a blood relationship by birth that brings them together, the church has the kinship of blood-bought-redemption through Jesus’ death on the cross.
The bond is strong and so should be our affection for one another and our willingness to put aside differences and love each other as Christ has loved the church. It will show the world much when they see brothers and sisters in Christ demonstrating kindness, gentleness, and love toward each other. And even if a little cereal sand is a result of the effort, we won’t let a little bit of grit get in the way of a godly response that will bring honor and glory to our Lord.
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